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Local & Area News: Wednesday, June 28, 2017

Tell City Man Flips Car in Morning Accident

DUBOIS CO. — A Tell City only suffering minor injuries in a crash this morning on State Road 162 in Dubois County.

Police say 25-year-old Jonathon Yates dozed off behind the wheel shortly before 6:30, losing control of his car, over correcting off the right side of the roadway down an embankment.

The car flipped a couple of times before landing in a bean field, according to accident reports.

Remarkably, Yates only suffered cuts to his face.

There was about $200 dollars in damage to the bean field.

Holland Crash Tuesday Hurts Two, Closes SR 161

HOLLAND — A 4 – car crash Tuesday in Holland sent two people to area hospitals and closed State Road 1-61 at 12-HUNDRED for a time.

Police say 47-year-old Pamela Waggoner of Oakland City was speeding approaching a work zone with flaggers.

She didn’t see cars slowed for the workers and rear-ended a car — sparking the chain – reaction crash.

Waggoner was airlifted to an area hospital.

The driver of another vehicle, 40-year-old Patricia Digman of Chrisney was transported to Memorial Hospital by ambulance with head injuries.

A crash investigation is on-going.

 

Car Slams into Huntingburg Home, No One Hurt

HUNTINGBURG — A Huntingburg family is ok after scary moments Tuesday when a truck slammed in to their home.

It happened just before 7:00 p.m. Tuesday  at a home in the 1900 Block of West 19th Street.

Police say the owner of the truck was jumping a lawnmower nearby when the truck jumped itself in to reverse, running over a mailbox before hitting the home.

People were in the home at the time but no one was hurt.

Damage to the home is estimated to be anywhere from $10,000 – $22,000 dollars.

 

Student Loan Rates Increase July 1st

STATEWIDE — Student loan rates are going up.  Beginning Saturday, rates on federal PLUS loans and the lower – cost Stafford Loans will increase around 3 quarters of a point.

The average Indiana graduate leaves school with $29,000 in student loan debt.

The increase would add $200 dollars a year in interest to that amount.

LISTEN:  Invested C-E-O Joe Wood says people need to comparison shop for student loans.

For most people, a federal loan is still the lowest – cost option but depending on your income and credit rating, it may not be.

That’s why Wood recommends doing your homework before taking out a student loan.

How Did We Get Here?  Opioids in Indiana

STATEWIDE — The opioid epidemic in Indiana has reached staggering proportions and it’s leaving many to wonder, How did we get here?

Joan Duwve, Indiana State Department of Health’s chief medical officer says a study in a pain management journal funded by the manufacturer of the powerful painkiller OxyContin concluded that opioid painkillers brought significant relief without a major addiction risk.

She contends that study was flawed, but laid the groundwork for a pain-management campaign in the 1990s endorsed by the Department of Veterans Affairs and a hospital accreditation agency.

As Eric Berman reports, it can be traced to a single medical journal article nearly 30 years ago.

LISTEN: Eric Berman Reports

That’s the verdict of the Indiana State Department of Health’s chief medical officer. Joan Duwve says the study in a pain management journal funded by the manufacturer of the powerful painkiller OxyContin concluded that opioid painkillers brought significant relief without a major addiction risk. She contends that study was flawed, but laid the groundwork for a pain-management campaign in the 1990s endorsed by the Department of Veterans Affairs and a hospital accreditation agency.

Since then, Duwve says, the rate of opioid prescriptions has increased fivefold. On average, every man, woman and child in Indiana received an opioid prescription last year.

Contrary to the study, however, addiction rates have soared since 2010, with Indiana outpacing even the rising national pace. Overdose deaths have risen along with it. Duwve notes overdose deaths are now more common in Indiana than fatal car crashes, with nearly 13-hundred last year. And Duwve says the real number might be closer to 19-hundred, because not all coroners run drug tests when conducting autopsies.

Duwve told an Indianapolis health conference it’s that statistic that alerted her to the seriousness of the opioid problem. Overdoses are categorized as “unintentional poisonings” on an annual tally of accidental deaths. She says when she investigated a sharp increase in 2010, she discovered the vast majority were opioids.

Information Released on New ATV Helmet Law

JASPER — The Dubois County Prosecutor’s Office has released a helpful Q&A sheet on Indiana’s new ATV Helmet Law that takes effect July 1st.

See the full release below…

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Our partners at DNR have asked that I share the attached FAQs regarding the new ATV helmet law that takes effect on July 1.

This law requires that children <18 wear a helmet, while riding an off-road vehicle, on public and private land.

ATV Helmet Law: Frequently asked questions

Does the Helmet Law apply to Side by Sides and UTV’s?

Yes, the law pertains to all vehicles that are designed for cross country travel.

If I place a child in a car seat, does the helmet law still apply?

Yes, the use of a car seat does not exclude a child, under age 18 from being required to wear a helmet when riding on an off-road vehicle.

Does the helmet law apply to ATV’s being used around the farm?

When used for “Farm purposes” the helmet law does not apply, however the law does apply when the vehicle is used for something other than “farming purposes”

Does the helmet law apply to Golf Carts?

Golf carts are excluded from this law and no helmet is required.

Does my child need to wear a helmet when on a motorized mini-bike or dirt-bike?

Yes, the law applies to all vehicles specifically designed for off-road travel, excluding golf-carts.

Is a helmet required when my child is operating or riding on a Go-Cart?

Yes, this law also applies to Go-Carts.

Does the helmet law apply to battery operated toy machines?

The law applies to any machine that is designed for cross country travel.  It includes certain battery operated machines, but the common toy machines that are only capable of slow back yard travel are not considered off road vehicles and helmets are not required for them.

Does this law only apply to public property or roadways?

No, the helmet law applies on public and private property.

Who is responsible if a violation is found by an officer?

The operator of any vehicle is ultimately responsible for any violation, including the failure of the operator to wear a helmet.  However, the new law also allows the adult that is responsible for the ATV to be cited for the offense.

Are Jeeps, Trucks, Crawlers, Dunebuggies or similar vehicles included on this list?

If a vehicle is unregistered through the BMV and used for the purpose of cross-country travel it is within the definition that requires a helmet for all occupants under the age of 18.

Following is the actual statute:

HOUSE ENROLLED ACT No. 1200

AN ACT to amend the Indiana Code concerning motor vehicles.

Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the State of Indiana:

SECTION 1. IC 9-18.1-14-11 IS ADDED TO THE INDIANA

CODE AS A NEW SECTION TO READ AS FOLLOWS

[EFFECTIVE JULY 1, 2017]: Sec. 11. (a) An individual less than

eighteen (18) years of age who is operating or riding on an off-road

vehicle shall wear a helmet that meets the standards established by

the United States Department of Transportation under 49 CFR

571.218 as in effect January 1, 1979.

     (b) An individual who violates this section commits a Class C

 infraction.

SECTION 2. IC 14-16-1-29, AS AMENDED BY P.L.195-2014,

SECTION12,ISAMENDEDTOREADASFOLLOWS[EFFECTIVE

JULY 1, 2017]: Sec. 29. (a) A person who violates section 8, 9, 11.5,

13, 14, 20, 21, 23(a)(3) through 23(a)(14), or 27, or 33 of this chapter

commits a Class C infraction.

(b) A person who knowingly or intentionally violates section 17,

18(a), 18(b), 18(c), 23(a)(1), 23(a)(2), or 24 of this chapter commits a

Class B misdemeanor.

(c) A person who violates section 18(d) or 18(e) of this chapter

commits a Class A infraction.

SECTION 3.IC14-16-1-33 ISADDEDTO THE INDIANA CODE

ASANEWSECTIONTOREADASFOLLOWS[EFFECTIVE

JULY 1, 2017]: Sec. 33. A person who is:

                   (1) the owner of an off-road vehicle;

     (2) in possession of an off-road vehicle; or

     (3) entitled to the possession of an off-road vehicle, whether

     by reason of legal title, lease, license, rental arrangement,

     lease with option to purchase, contract of conditional sale, or

     otherwise;

may not knowingly authorize or permit an individual less than

eighteen (18) years of age to operate the off-road vehicle in

violation of IC 9-18.1-14-11.

 

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